Cover of: Salome | J. C. Heywood Read Online
Share

Salome the daughter of Herodias. A dramatic poem. by J. C. Heywood

  • 977 Want to read
  • ·
  • 4 Currently reading

Published by Putnam in New York .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Salome (Biblical figure) -- Drama

Book details:

Classifications
LC ClassificationsPS1924.H64 S3 1862
The Physical Object
Pagination251 p.
Number of Pages251
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL6600055M
LC Control Number17020159
OCLC/WorldCa5058560

Download Salome

PDF EPUB FB2 MOBI RTF

Apr 10,  · Salome was fantastic. I don’t usually read historical fictions, so I was pleasantly surprised how much I enjoyed this book. I found Salome to be an interesting character with an overwhelming need to please her mother. About half way through the book I couldn’t put it down/5. Jan 02,  · Question: "Who was Salome in the Bible?" Answer: There are two women named Salome in the Bible, but only one is mentioned by that name. One Salome was righteous; the other unrighteous. The righteous Salome was the wife of Zebedee (Matthew ), the mother of the disciples James and John, and a female follower of tonyasgaapartments.com Salome was the one who came to Jesus with the request . The play unfolds on the terrace of Herod's palace above the banquet hall. A gigantic staircase stands to the left; a cistern surrounded by a wall of green bronze appears at the back. Jun 09,  · After reading this book, I feel that Salome helped me better understand why that was a point that stuck. This book is less a biography of a man or the relationship between Salome and Nietzsche; much more so a summary of the relationship of Nietzsche the man, the work he produced and speculation on how those two were destined to be entwined/5(9).

Salome, daughter of Herodias and stepdaughter of the tetrarch Herod Antipas. She was the immediate agent in the execution of John the Baptist, who had condemned her mother’s marriage to Herod. After she danced for Herod, he promised to grant her any wish. Prompted by Herodias, she asked for John’s head on a platter. Salome is a simple tale of complex passion. Wilde's heroine bears no resemblance to her biblical origin. His Salome is no mere instrument of Herodias, but a dangerous and passionate young woman whose thwarted affections for John the Baptist lead to a disasterous climax for all persons involved.5/5(1). SALOME, Daughter of Herodias THE SLAVES OF SALOME SALOME SALOME SCENE-A great terrace in the Palace of Herod, set about the banqueting hall. Some soldiers are leaning over the balcony. To the right there is a gigantic staircase, to the left, at the back, an old cistern surrounded by a wall of green bronze. The moon is shining very brightly. On its publication in book form "Salomé" was greeted by a chorus of ridicule, and it may be noted in passing that at least two of the more violent reviews were from the pens of unsuccessful dramatists, while all those whose French never went beyond Ollendorff were glad to find in that venerable school classic an unsuspected asset in their.

Salomé Summary. The scene: Herod's palace. Night. A group of soldiers stands on a balcony. Below, Herod is throwing a lavish banquet. A young Syrian looks down . A number of critics believe Wilde's Salomé to be an allegory for the work of art itself. As Wilde told a friend with regards to her essential representation—the dance of the seven veils—Salomé should appear "totally naked, but draped with heavy and ringing necklaces made of jewels of every color, warm with the fervor of her amber flesh. Jul 06,  · Salome illuminated! This edition presents Salome as a formally complex, richly intertextual, and generative phenomenon of international modernism. Kimberly Stern sets a superbly annotated text between an extensive introduction and several appendices documenting the play’s literary, cultural, and visual sources, its reception, and its 4/5(1). Salome of the Tenements shocked many critics and writers when first published in , but its author was immediately hailed as a major new talent. A love story of a working-class Salome and her highborn John the Baptist, the novel is based on the real-life story of Jewish immigrant Rose Pastor's fairytale romance with the millionaire socialist Graham Stokes.2/5(1).