Work-related asthma symptoms among professional cleaners.
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Work-related asthma symptoms among professional cleaners.

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Published .
Written in English


Book details:

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Cleaners have been reported to have increased risk for work-related asthma symptoms (WRAS). This study examines whether cleaners have more WRAS compared to other building workers (OBW) and if this can be attributed to frequency of task performances. School board and racetrack workers in Ontario, Canada completed a questionnaire to establish the prevalence of physician-diagnosed asthma (PDA), new-onset asthma (NOA), respiratory symptoms, and WRAS. Among both genders cleaners and OBW had a similar prevalence of PDA, NOA, respiratory symptoms, and WRAS. Female cleaners reported significantly more WRAS. Male cleaners who waxed, and wax stripped floors, spot cleaned carpets, and cleaned tile and grout with a high frequency, reported more WRAS. Time spent performing these tasks was associated with WRAS when they took 4 or more hours. MSDSs for the cleaning chemicals indicate that agents associated with asthma were present suggesting a relationship between task performance and WRAS among male cleaners.

The Physical Object
Pagination262 leaves.
Number of Pages262
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL19551823M
ISBN 109780494213254

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Cleaners with a rash within the past year were significantly more likely to have work-related asthma symptoms than cleaners without a rash (P). CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates a strong link between work-related symptoms of asthma and dermatitis among by:   Cleaners with a rash within the past year were significantly more likely to have work-related asthma symptoms than cleaners without a rash (P). Conclusions This study demonstrates a strong link between work-related symptoms of asthma and dermatitis among by:   Eleven per cent of work-related asthma cases were among those exposed to cleaning agents: 55% of these were likely occupational asthma and 45% work-exacerbated asthma. Causative agents could not be determined with certainty, but the most common exposures were surfactants, alcohols, disinfectants and by: 4. Work-related asthma (WRA) is a form of asthma caused or aggravated by workplace agents or conditions. Substantial proportion of all adult asthma cases are .

In recent years, cleaning has been identified as an occupational risk, because of an increased incidence of asthma and asthma-like symptoms among cleaning workers [1] [2] [3][4][5][6][7]. Adverse. Cleaning agents have emerged as a leading cause of work-related asthma in industrialized countries, mediated by both irritant and hypersensitivity mechanisms. Common causes in the West Midlands, UK during –16 have been chloramines, glutaraldehyde and quaternary amine compounds, seen commonly in the healthcare, education and leisure. Similarly, cleaners were found to have a >2-fold increased risk of work-related asthma (OR = , 95% CI –) and >5-fold increased risk of work-related wheezing (OR = , 95% CI –) in the USA. Despite their large numbers, cleaners as a work group have rarely been studied in .   The risk from cleaning products is not only seen among professional cleaners, said Dr. Norman H. Edelman, senior consultant for scientific affairs at the American Lung Association (ALA).

Cleaners are at risk of some asthma‐associated symptoms and reduced lung function. However, as it was not strongly associated with wheeze and atopy, and airway obstruction was less reversible, asthma in some cleaners may represent a distinct phenotype. 1 INTRODUCTION.   A.A. Arif, G.L. DelclosAssociation between cleaning-related chemicals and work-related asthma and asthma symptoms among healthcare professionals Occup Environ Med, 69 (), pp. CrossRef View Record in Scopus Google Scholar. Conclusions Cleaning work in places with high demand for disinfection, high cleaning standards and use of cleaning products containing respiratory irritants is associated with higher risk of asthma symptoms. This suggests irritants have an important role in cleaning-related asthma. If you’ve already got asthma (not occupational asthma) and you’ve noticed your symptoms getting worse when you’re at work, you can get more advice here. And don’t forget you can speak to one of our asthma nurse specialists on (9am-5pm; Mon-Fri) or WhatsApp them on